9 ways to decode your baby’s cries

Posted on April 30th, 2018

When it comes to decoding your baby’s cries, there are lots of ways to do it. Here’s some expert advice. By Xanet Van Vuuren

As a parent, don’t you wish you could instantly decode your baby’s cries? Because let’s face it, we want to help our little ones as soon as possible and crying episodes can make us feel distressed. However, the good news is, crying isn’t always a bad thing.

In fact, crying is the only form of communication a baby has with his parents or caregiver. Babies cry for the same reason as children and adults to tell us they’re hungry, wet, in pain, frustrated or need more love and cuddling. They key is to figure out what the problem is quickly.

ALSO SEE: 5 tips to soothe your baby’s cries 

How to decode your baby’s cries 

Reason for crying

Your baby might be too hot or too cold.

What to do

Feel the nape of your little one’s neck to check that he has a comfortable body temperature. If his neck is clammy, it means he’s too hot and if his neck is comfortably warm, his body temperature is just right. He might also be cold. Check his chest, hands and feet to determine what his core temperature is.

Reason for crying

A red, angry face, flexing limbs, held up knees and an abdomen that feels like an ironing board may indicate discomfort and stomach cramps/digestive issues which is quite common with new baby’s as it takes time for the digestive system to mature.

What to do

Feed your baby more often and not according to a schedule, reduce dairy and grain products in your diet if you’re breastfeeding, consider changing formula milk to a specialised one if you’re not breatsfeeding and gently massage your baby’s tummy and the instep of your little one’s feet in a clockwise direction. If your baby posits or vomits forcefully and seems to be in pain, but is generally well and gaining weight, the anti-spasmodic action of Mag phos may relieve his crying very quickly.If all this doesn’t work, talk to your GP or peadiatrician.

ALSO SEE: Coping with colic 

Reason for crying

If your child is tired, he’ll pull, rub or swipe his ears while crying.

What to do

Learn to recognise these signs and make sure that your little one has regular naps and you don’t keep him awake too long between sleeps. Once your baby is overtired and past his sleep window, it might be more tricky to calm him down.

Reason for crying

Your little one may be experiencing discomfort.

What to do

Check the colour of his hands and feet to make sure that there are no ribbons or garments restricting his blood flow or a shirt label that could be scratching his skin.

Reason for crying

Loud crying is seldom associated with a serious illness, but sometimes certain types of colic and structural urinary tract problems may be accompanied by loud crying.

What to do

If your home remedies aren’t helping, take your child to the doctor.

Reason for crying

Sick babies often whimper or cry more softly and pitifully and will show other signs of illness.

What to do

Use your intuitive sense and if at all concerned, or Baby is listless and weak, see the doctor.

ALSO SEE: three newborn illnesses to watch out for

Reason for crying

A peevish, fretful, impatient and irritable cry might come from a high-need child who’s more difficult to satisfy.

What to do

Homeopathic Chamomilla tablets generally improve matters.

Reason for crying

A higher pitched cry than you’re used to may indicate that your baby has an ear infection.

What to do

See your doctor if your baby has a fever or seems ill. You can also use homeopathic remedies for natural care of ear infections like ear ache.

Reason for crying

A dry, raspy cry may indicate a sore throat or a cry that ends with a bark-like cough may mean yoir baby has croup.

What to do

Use homeopathic remedies for a sore throat, breastfeed your little more often and if there is no improvement, see the doctor.

 

 

Living And Loving Staff

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