6 things you need to know about having sex after birth

Posted on April 16th, 2018

Having sex after birth may be the last thing on your mind, especially when you’re up all night taking care of your newborn. But, it is a vital aspect to your relationship. These tips will help you get back in the bedroom. By registered midwife Pippa Hime

6 things you need to know about having sex after birth

Towards the end of pregnancy sex is often the last thing on your mind. But once you get past your six-week check after delivery, you and your partner may be thinking about it a lot.

ALSO SEE: 10 things dads should know about sex during pregnancy

Everyone is different. For some getting their groove back in the bedroom is easy, but for many others it can be a little tougher. It’s normal to be apprehensive about having sex after birth. You may feel exhausted, and it’s hard to muster up the enthusiasm to shave your legs let alone get jazzed up for a date night. Irrespective, sex is a vital aspect to your relationship.

Here are some tips for getting it back in the bedroom:

Don’t feel rushed

Not all women are ready for sex at exactly six weeks after having a baby. Communicate your fears with your partner about having sex after birth. It’s important to realise that there is no “normal” when it comes to postpartum sex. Some new moms take months to feel remotely interested while others can’t wait for the suggested six-week recovery time.

Get to know each other again

It may have been a while since you and your partner explored each other’s bodies, and things are bound to have changed since having a baby. Whether these are physical (episiotomy scars) or psychological (concerns about how your partner feels after watching you give birth) changes, take it slow and get to know what makes your post-baby body tick.

Lubricate

Mother Nature had a contraceptive trick up her sleeve when it comes to sex after birth. Breastfeeding and the postnatal hormonal rollercoaster you’re on can lead to vaginal dryness, which makes sex uncomfortable. With this in mind, ensure you’re prepared.

Contraception

Breastfeeding isn’t a contraceptive, so make sure you have your plan and preferred method in place. You don’t want to be worrying about being pregnant with three-month-old baby.

Click here for a guide on birth control while breastfeeding.

Seize the moment

Don’t underestimate the value of the quickie. New parents often don’t have hours free to spend in bed.

Give yourself time

Don’t expect to get straight back into a sex every day routine. Rather focus on quality versus quantity. Your body may not look the same as it did before birth, so give yourself time to get back into shape if that’s important to you. Appreciate that your body has changed, and fall in love with the new you.


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